"In the traditional fields, this style of etiquette is something you will encounter frequently. In the past, it was something done every day, not just by those priviliged. No matter what their size or shape, Japanese doors of all kinds are opened in the same way: you kneel at the crack of the door and push it open, then you come into the room by sliding forward on your knees. This is quite a simplified description of entering a room, as any exponent of a truly classical Way or art of Japan will tell you. There are all kinds of manners to be observed in this simple action of opening a door and coming into a room if you are to observe the protocol of ancient Japan. The point is, to the Japanese of the feudal period, even an ordinary, everyday task like entering a room had a significance and a prescribed order that evolved about it. Look at it this way: it would be very easy to make a flashy, imposing entrance through a Japanese style door. You could sling open the door along its track with a vigorous shove, banging it against the supporting frame with a dramatic thump! Remember, too, that people sit on the floor in a traditional Japanese home. If you come striding into the room standing up, you are going to tower over everyone sitting there. You will be imposing. You will have the attention of everyone in the room. Literally, everyone there would, indeed, be in the position of looking up to you. To many, this would, indeed, seem a most attractive way to ‘make an entrance’, so they must wonder why it is that etiquette demands just the opposite. The answer is that manners in Japan, a good many of them at least, have always been directed at maintaining and preserving social harmony. Getting along with the other fellow was important, and important, too, was the concept that the individual self was not so significant as the welfare of the group.The higher in the social order the individual, then, the more humble and self-effacing he often was in his conduct. The “classier” the person, the less he needed to display himself. And such customs is what we still use to this very day."

— Learning about etiquette - have you ever observed the way maiko and geiko open the zashiki doors? Here’s a quote from a great article that explains it, read the full article here :http://www.koryu.com/library/dlowry6.html

athousandtales-imvu:

floating-flowers:

oiran-geisha:

The geiko Koaki. She is a delicate beauty… (Source1 , Source2)

I think this is Fumimari from Miyagawacho,not Koaki. Koaki worked in Gion Kobu and I think she’s retired now.

Geiko Fumisono is such a beauty. I love that first picture most.

geisha-kai:

NEWS: Minarai Fukune debuted from okiya Kawayoshi today in Miyagawacho! Her big sister is geiko Fukue.
(SOURCE)

geisha-kai:

NEWS: Minarai Fukune debuted from okiya Kawayoshi today in Miyagawacho! Her big sister is geiko Fukue.

(SOURCE)

i-r-o-k-e:

(click the photos to be taken to their source)

Kikugawa-tayuu 菊川太夫

I’ve wanted to write about kottai-san for sometime now, but I couldn’t decide who to start with. Then I came across these photos of the beautiful Kikugawa seated in front of a painted screen, waiting to dance.

Let me back up a bit and give you some vocabulary. “Tayuu” is often used incorrectly as a general term for courtesans. People will say, “Tayuu is for Kyoto, Oiran for Tokyo”, but this is incorrect: tayuu is the highest rank a courtesan can reach. In the glory days of the Yoshiwara (in Tokyo) and Shimabara (in Kyoto) pleasure districts, reaching this rank was very difficult. One had to be uniquely beautiful, stylish, and have something to offer in the way of entertainment that other courtesans did not. Today, the women we call tayuu are entertainers—trained in traditional arts similar to those of the geisha, but given this title out of respect for the continuation of their unique tradition. In the Kantō region (around Tokyocourtesans are collectively called “oiran,” and in the Kansai region (around Kyoto) ”kottai" is used.

Kikugawa-tayuu is associated with the Kushigiku okiya in Shimabara, home of the famous former tayuu, Takasago, who now presides as “mother” over the okiya. Courtesans would take new names as they moved up the ranks, and tayuu’s names, which are quite poetic, often followed a lineage. Takasago is a classical reference to the city of that name, famous for its everlasting pines and views of the sea. Kikugawa-tayuu’s name is more obscure, but it could be taken from the city of Kikugawa, famous for its tea. It’s often hard to trace these lineages because very little literature of the sort is available.

Kikugawa-tayuu often gives dance and tea ceremony demonstrations, and she can be seen around New Year’s time making mochi at the Houjuu Temple in Kyoto with her 2 kamuro (child attendants). The eldest of her kamuro is the granddaughter of a monk there.

Her hairstyle, the “hyougo-mage” is unique among the tayuu performing today. It is said to have originated with the prostitutes of the Settsu province in Hyougo prefecture, hence the name. Takasago city is in Hyougo, so you can see some of the elegant, unspoken, connections being made between Kikugawa-tayuu and Takasago-tayuu.

Check out the source links below for more photos and information (in Japanese).

(source 1) (source 2) (source 3)

And as a bonus, here are some YouTube videos of Kikugawa-tayuu:

Please do not reblog without my caption or source links. 
Ookini! 蛍斗

(for you, oiran-geisha ^-^)

Very good text, so many useful informations :D Thank you!

(via mikaeri-yanagi)

[NEWS] Meet Minarai Komako!

geisha-kai:

gion-east:

Haruka just became a Minarai! Now,her name is “Komako”! (駒子)
Congratulations,Komako-chan! May you have a long and successful career!
Omedetousan dosu~! \ (^o^) /

imageMinarai Komako and Geiko Hinagiku (Okatome)

(SOURCE)

Great news! So there are two minarai in Gion Higashi - Komako and Kanohiro. I especially love Komako’s old-fashioned name ^^

According to this post, Toshichika retired on Sept 20th.

Marika and Satsuki - I assume shooting an episode of their show KoiMaiko

Marika and Satsuki - I assume shooting an episode of their show KoiMaiko

floating-flowers:

Maiko Mamegiku in September

floating-flowers:

Maiko Mamegiku in September

Maiko Mamegiku in September

Maiko Mamegiku in September