"Maiko Satohana" - oil painting on linen canvas
by Phil Couture
http://philcouture.com/

"Maiko Satohana" - oil painting on linen canvas

by Phil Couture

http://philcouture.com/

mikaeri-yanagi:

Tsukasa-tayuu 司太夫 & Furisode-tayuu 振袖太夫
(Photo Credit)
Pictured above is Tsukasa-tayuu (to the right) and her Tayuu apprentice known as “Furisode-tayuu.”
“Furisode-tayuu” is not her name, but her title: the rank just bellow Tayuu, named for the long-sleeved kimono she wears signifying youth and her amateur status (known as “furisode-shinzou” in the Kanto region). This will all be changing on November 26th when she has her formal debut (misedashi) after an almost 6-year apprenticeship, and becomes a full-fledged Tayuu. She will probably be renamed when she moves up in rank, as is customary with the this profession. (Unlike geisha, who are given one name when they become apprentices which they will carry through their professional lives.)
This young woman is a unique case of being born into the profession! From the age of 2 until 12 she had been in the position of child attendant (kamuro) to her mother, Tsukasa-tayuu. At 15 she moved up in rank and began formal training, which involves following Tsukasa-tayuu to ozashiki and other events, learning by watching and participation. She is now 20.
Furisode-tayuu, whose real name is Ayaka, is also a part-time actress (drama as well as voice acting) and singer, according to her blog.
____
Tsukasa-tayuu was born Nakagawa Yukie in the Yamashina district of Kyoto. At the age of 16 she became a maiko (geimei: Namiko 奈見子) in the most famous geisha district, Gion Kobu, where she studied dance, tea ceremony, ikebana, and the koto — all artistic accomplishments relevant to her later career. At the age of 23, when her contact as a geisha ended, the head of the Wachigaiya teahouse in Shimabara suggested she become a tayuu.
Tsukasa-tayuu has appeared on television, radio, and the stage, as well as giving lectures all over Japan. In 2001 she launched a small newspaper aimed at gathering information about the goings-on of the few Shimabara Tayuu, called Kottai no Kai, (Kottai Association; “kottai” being the word used in Shimabara to refer to courtesans). In October 2009 she opened her own bar/lounge called Kottai no Mise Tsukasa. And in 2014 she helped coach the cast of Maiko wa Lady (舞妓はレディ) in proper Kyoto dialect and mannerisms.
She has certainly been a busy woman from the very beginning of her career! You can follow her on her blog and keep track of both women at once on their website.
(source 1) (source 2) (source 3) (source 4)

mikaeri-yanagi:

Tsukasa-tayuu 司太夫 & Furisode-tayuu 振袖太夫

(Photo Credit)

Pictured above is Tsukasa-tayuu (to the right) and her Tayuu apprentice known as “Furisode-tayuu.”

“Furisode-tayuu” is not her name, but her title: the rank just bellow Tayuu, named for the long-sleeved kimono she wears signifying youth and her amateur status (known as “furisode-shinzou” in the Kanto region). This will all be changing on November 26th when she has her formal debut (misedashi) after an almost 6-year apprenticeship, and becomes a full-fledged Tayuu. She will probably be renamed when she moves up in rank, as is customary with the this profession. (Unlike geisha, who are given one name when they become apprentices which they will carry through their professional lives.)

This young woman is a unique case of being born into the profession! From the age of 2 until 12 she had been in the position of child attendant (kamuro) to her mother, Tsukasa-tayuu. At 15 she moved up in rank and began formal training, which involves following Tsukasa-tayuu to ozashiki and other events, learning by watching and participation. She is now 20.

Furisode-tayuu, whose real name is Ayaka, is also a part-time actress (drama as well as voice acting) and singer, according to her blog.

____

Tsukasa-tayuu was born Nakagawa Yukie in the Yamashina district of Kyoto. At the age of 16 she became a maiko (geimei: Namiko 奈見子) in the most famous geisha district, Gion Kobu, where she studied dance, tea ceremony, ikebana, and the koto — all artistic accomplishments relevant to her later career. At the age of 23, when her contact as a geisha ended, the head of the Wachigaiya teahouse in Shimabara suggested she become a tayuu.

Tsukasa-tayuu has appeared on television, radio, and the stage, as well as giving lectures all over Japan. In 2001 she launched a small newspaper aimed at gathering information about the goings-on of the few Shimabara Tayuu, called Kottai no Kai, (Kottai Association; “kottai” being the word used in Shimabara to refer to courtesans). In October 2009 she opened her own bar/lounge called Kottai no Mise Tsukasa. And in 2014 she helped coach the cast of Maiko wa Lady (舞妓はレディ) in proper Kyoto dialect and mannerisms.

She has certainly been a busy woman from the very beginning of her career! You can follow her on her blog and keep track of both women at once on their website.

(source 1) (source 2) (source 3) (source 4)

Kanako and Toshimomo, October 2014 (Instagram)

Kanako and Toshimomo, October 2014 (Instagram)

gion-east:

Maiko Tomitae (Tomikiku) (SOURCE)

Looks like she’s wearing ofuku now!

gion-east:

Maiko Tomitae (Tomikiku) (SOURCE)

Looks like she’s wearing ofuku now!

geisha-kai:

Minarai boom in Miyagawacho! Meet Fukune, Fukuhana and Fukutama who will debut as maiko very soon

(SOURCE)

geisha-kai:

Today in Kyoto: Zuiki Matsuri of Kamishichiken

With maiko Umechie, Umecho, Umesaku, geiko Satonosuke, Naokazu, maiko Katsuna, Katsune and Ichitomo

Photos by @lapan3, @helvetica, @koitomoon

Mamegiku in October 2014 (Instagram)

Kanohiro’s misedashi!

Kanohiro’s misedashi!

"In the traditional fields, this style of etiquette is something you will encounter frequently. In the past, it was something done every day, not just by those priviliged. No matter what their size or shape, Japanese doors of all kinds are opened in the same way: you kneel at the crack of the door and push it open, then you come into the room by sliding forward on your knees. This is quite a simplified description of entering a room, as any exponent of a truly classical Way or art of Japan will tell you. There are all kinds of manners to be observed in this simple action of opening a door and coming into a room if you are to observe the protocol of ancient Japan. The point is, to the Japanese of the feudal period, even an ordinary, everyday task like entering a room had a significance and a prescribed order that evolved about it. Look at it this way: it would be very easy to make a flashy, imposing entrance through a Japanese style door. You could sling open the door along its track with a vigorous shove, banging it against the supporting frame with a dramatic thump! Remember, too, that people sit on the floor in a traditional Japanese home. If you come striding into the room standing up, you are going to tower over everyone sitting there. You will be imposing. You will have the attention of everyone in the room. Literally, everyone there would, indeed, be in the position of looking up to you. To many, this would, indeed, seem a most attractive way to ‘make an entrance’, so they must wonder why it is that etiquette demands just the opposite. The answer is that manners in Japan, a good many of them at least, have always been directed at maintaining and preserving social harmony. Getting along with the other fellow was important, and important, too, was the concept that the individual self was not so significant as the welfare of the group.The higher in the social order the individual, then, the more humble and self-effacing he often was in his conduct. The “classier” the person, the less he needed to display himself. And such customs is what we still use to this very day."

— Learning about etiquette - have you ever observed the way maiko and geiko open the zashiki doors? Here’s a quote from a great article that explains it, read the full article here :http://www.koryu.com/library/dlowry6.html

athousandtales-imvu:

floating-flowers:

oiran-geisha:

The geiko Koaki. She is a delicate beauty… (Source1 , Source2)

I think this is Fumimari from Miyagawacho,not Koaki. Koaki worked in Gion Kobu and I think she’s retired now.

Geiko Fumisono is such a beauty. I love that first picture most.